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The Secret Return of Alex Mack

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Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from asqwerth
Review:
Only in reviews of Diane Castle stories will you find such heated and long arguments on non-story topics popping up so regularly amongst the reviewers!

:-D

Sorry, that is more a "review" of other reviews, rather than a review of the latest chapter.

But on a similar note, when I first watched How to Train Your Dragon (which I really LOVED, more so than Frozen), I thought there were some similarities with Ratatouille.

In both, you have an affable, nice but maybe awkward boy who doesn't seem very impressive in his skills and capabilities. They are both hiding a big secret involving a sentient non-human creature. Through the creature, they begin to shine in their respective fields. This earns them the ire of the highly competent female protagonist, who is highly skilled in that field, and who can't figure out how is it that that clueless boy is doing so much better than she is. She gets suspicious and tries to get to the bottom of this mystery.

Of course, the rest of the storylines, and the focus of both stories, are very different. But I remember thinking when Astrid was gnashing her teeth at another amazing performance by Hiccup in the dragon arena that, hey, that's Colette and Alfredo!
Review By [asqwerth] • Date [20 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "The Tree of Red" from SirLee
Review:
Oh, Larry, if only you hadn't been a dick, you could be naming Willow Rosenberg as your successor... you should at least offered her a deal to be Oracle's CTO, but no, you had to be a dick.

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/09/larry-ellison-steps-down-as-oracle-ceo/
Comments from author:
:D :D

Does anyone let women be CEOs of major ongoing corporations, unless they are using them as short-term hatchetmen?
Review By [SirLee] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from Magi
Review:
Yes, Alex might me four hours from the moon. But it better be made of green cheese, because it's going to take a ton of energy to get there!
Comments from author:
Green really yummy cheese. With enough atmosphere that Alex can eat.
Review By [Magi] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from TiaC
Review:
"Yes. Alex has not worked this out yet. Right now, she's flying at about 150 mph (240 kph) and is limited by wind resistance while in the bottom few miles of the atmosphere."

This really should be higher. If she uses all her tk to go up, she should end up traveling 1.5^.5 times faster than her terminal velocity. As http://hypertextbook.com/facts/JianHuang.shtml shows in its citations, a skydiver who is diving rather than spread-eagled can easily achieve speeds of 160-180 mph. This means that Alex should be able to reach 195-220 mph.

"So she won't get much acceleration until she's above, say, five miles. Then the acceleration won't be 1.5g until she's even higher."

I was unclear with terminology here. I should have said that the net upward force she will be able to exert is ~15N/kg of her mass.

"But she can get well up into the atmosphere to the point that wind resistance becomes much much lower, and then she can start moving toward 2.5g acceleration. Once she's high enough, she can accelerate to ridiculous speeds fairly rapidly.

In fact, if you go back and look, you'll see that I did this with her when she went up to the ISS. She kept getting ahead of what she was aiming at, and she didn't realize that the problem was her acceleration when she was used to hitting a maximum speed and having no further acceleration."

Oh, definitely. I just wanted to point out how thin the atmosphere really is and how quickly she can leave it. When I first started doing the math I didn't expect her to outpace a Blackbird, so I was surprised to see that under an hour could take her anywhere.

Edit: She's less than four hours from the moon!
Comments from author:
Four hours to the moon? I had not done that computation.
Review By [TiaC] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Return" from fpb
Review:
Sir Lee, the more you claim not to be defensive, the more defensive you sound. I had not intended this to be such a kerfuffle over an obviously not wholly serious little video, but your reaction was so extreme as to set off every bit of critical instinct I have. I have seen almost no DS9 and no Babylon5, so you could say that they feature a mouse wearing red shorts with gold buttons and I would not know the difference, but speak of - for instance - Western movies, and we can talk. The point is that narrative similarities are not casual; they indicate common assumptions - for instance, every ship having a medical officer involves a number of presuppositions over the role of medicine - and make for significant story points. A number of these points were certainly there in these two movies. That they may be found elsewhere does not alter that.
Comments from author:
I agree with everything you say except two points: I do not think SirLee was being defensive, and I don't agree with your last sentence.

My whole point is that if it is a trope that *everyone* (or everyone in a genre) uses, then claiming two movie are similar because they both use that trope? Meaningless. It's like claiming two musicals are the same because they both have a genre of song in them. He's pointing out things which are standard tropes across Disney movies, or in some cases, across musical movies, or even across larger sets of movies.
Review By [fpb] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from SirLee
Review:
fpb, for the record, I wasn't "extraordinarily defensive." I pointed out that *half* (not all) of the points were stylistic choices. I didn't even *SEE* "Frozen", the last time I watched "Lion King" was during its original first run, and yet it was glaringly obvious to me that his comparison was invalid -- because the points of similarity he managed to find are NOT really unique or distinctive. Surely, there are some commonality of tropes -- they are both Disney films targeted at teens, after all -- but jumping from there to "they are the same film" is reaching. It's like... well... it's like saying "Babylon 5" and "Deep Space Nine" are the same series because:

- They are SF series;
- They happen in the future;
- Main setting is a space station;
- Main character is male station commander;
- Second-in-command is female;
- There are aliens living and doing business at the station;
- There's some soft of space warp near the station;
- Commander lost wife tragically sometime in the past;
- A medical officer is an important character;
- So is the security officer;
- And a couple resident aliens;
- There's a space war;
- Some alien races are reluctant allies;
- Enemy aliens have stealthy powers;
- A new, small, powerful class of ship will prove important to the war;
- Commander sort-of-dies-but-not-really on the last episode
- One of the female leads gets involved with a warrior-type character who is a late addition to the series;
- One major female character leaves the series just before the last season;

Well, you get the point. I could keep cherry-picking points of similarity between both series all day long, and STILL the claim that they are "the same story" would be ridiculous.
Comments from author:
I think you could take the video author's points and argue that ALL Disney movies are the same.

Now the original point that I was trying to make was only that 'Frozen' did not adhere to the standard 'girls have to be Barbie princesses' tropes, and I thought that was cool. No pun intended. I certainly am not going to claim that 'Frozen' is the greatest thing ever cranked out by Disney's mice.
Review By [SirLee] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from fpb
Review:
Sorry, I remain thoroughly unconvinced

1) I had conceded that the opening song is a stylistic feature. By trying to push this point, you do yourself no favours, since most operas do not in fact start with a song. The operatic equivalent to the song in a musical comedy or movie is the aria, and I can't think of a single opera that opens with an aria. Aida? The Barber of Seville? The Rhinegold? La Traviata? Figaro's Wedding? Boris Godunov? In fact, if there is one thing that is regular in opera it is that, apart from the ouverture - which Verdi in particular liked to avoid - it opens with a scene. The opening song is a typically cinematic feature.
[2] "All kids HAVE to be overly cute, unless the whole point of the story is that they are little monsters." And your point is? if you are trying to make the point that the two movies are different, this hardly proves it.
EDITED IN: as a matter of fact, Disney movies allow a certain amount of difference in the presentation of the hero/ine. Ariel, in The Little Mermaid, is a little fool - think of the "he loves me, he loves me not" scene just before "Under The Sea" - and Ursula is correspondingly more clever and even more open about what she is doing. Ariel still falls for it, and ultimately only escapes because the boy she had fallen for turns out to be a genuine fighting hero who never gives up. Simba is simply an innocent child, and even so Scar has to weave a whole web of lies to get rid of him, because Simba may be a bit of a brat ("I just can't wait to be king"), but he is not self-deluded as Ariel was.
[3] "...the death of the king and queen (together) does not cause any problem in Frozen. The thing that triggers the problem for the countryside is not even a death. This is just a ridiculous stretch on the part of the video author." No it is not. The lack of the guardian and husband of the land (the Fisher King is a very recent avatar of the idea - read Ananda Coomaraswamy, for instance) is the opening to all disaster. Whether the disaster happens directly or not does not matter. For that matter, you might say that the blight strikes Mufasa's kingdom because Scar and his hyenas are bad hunters.
[4] "All Disney movies have a (real or about-to-happen) parental death that is central to the plot," Of course, Pinocchio, Fantasia, Dumbo, Sleeping Beauty and Mary Poppins are not Disney movies.
[5] "The 'run off in panic' motif is used really often in movies to put the character or other characters in danger. Go through the last twenty Disney movies. Find five where it is not used at least once." And of course it is always because of the villain's lies and of a mistaken belief that the hero/ine has committed an inexcusable act of manslaughter against a member of the family. Yes? I wait to see your list of twenty false charges dreamed up by the chief villain.
[6] No, the point is that these two songs, at similar points, do similar things. Namely. the hero/ine disengages emotionally from a devastating recent past. Find me the numerous "I don't care" Disney song on this theme.
[7] I send you back to my response in point 3. The health of the king is mystically bound with the health of the land. That the point is less harshly made in Frozen has a lot to do with the considerably lower narrative tension and consistency of the later movie. (Incidentally, my degree is in Social Anthropology and Religious Studies - of course I read Fraser.)
[8] The bad guy tries to do what Scar successfully does. His procedure and lies are pretty much the same. The fact that he is less harshly dealt with has to do with the lesser tension and much swifter resolution of the drama.EDITED IN: Even though the usurper could never have tried his wiles if the king and queen had been around. Their death is the precondition for his crimes.
[9] If you insist that an usurper who drives out the rightful heir by an atrocious lie is unlike an usurper who drives out the rightful heir by an atrocious lie, there isn't much more I can say.
[10] The villain in FRozen di did not do as much damage as Scar. His punishment is correspondingly less harsh. (Scar's punishment is the direct counterpass, with Dante-esque logic, of his main lying promise: he had promised the hyenas that if they followed him they would never know hunger again - they are in fact hungry, so they eat him.) Even so, being humiliatingly dunked in the harbour in front of the whole populace is a pretty dreadful punishment for a man who would have been king.
[11] It's not about it being a kid movie. Casablanca was not a kid movie. The Magnificent Seven was not a kid's movie. All The President's Men was not a kid movie. You have to save the kingdom - the nation - the constitution - or simply the village, because it is morally right. Of course, you can have the reverse point - you fail to save the kingdom, and everything goes to Hell (the various distopias of a lot of recent movies).
[12] You are only saying that these are variations on a theme. To the extent where the "happy ever after" is not as fully achieved as it is in LK, to the extent where the family does not seem as securely anchored, to that extent things are not as happy. But this absolutely contradicts your original point: far from doing anything to contradict traditional Disney values, this movie takes them entirely at their face value. If there had been a kingless and family-less happy ever after, you could say otherwise. There is none.

The funny thing is that the author of the original video was not being entirely serious, as these things rarely are. But your and Sir Lee's extraordinarily defensive and denying reactions did nothing but bring out that he had a lot more of a point than I at first thought.

EDITED IN: And going back to the movie, I find that I had forgotten just how objectionable I had found the first few minutes of "everyone be scared of Elsa and lock her away". It is the worst kind of mutant cliche', and I don't understand why you should be so defensive about this movie when you yourself have handled a similar theme - with Shar - about a hundred times better.
Comments from author:
Was I really extraordinarily defensive? Hmm. I didn't think so. Maybe it was the lack of context and tonality in a text setting. At any rate, I still think the guy was pushing his concepts harder than a doctoral thesis on Joseph Conrad.
Review By [fpb] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from Metamorphmagus
Review:
Is it just me, or is Alex taking quite a but if painkillers quite often?

Oh those poor villans, they just cant catch a break can they, Terrawatt, Action Girl and Pyre, all taking a vacation near their op. Someone should start a charity, wmds for villans...

I like how Alex dosent grasp how impressive inverted sit ups can be, once again not seeing how strong she really is. Nicely consistent

*edit* true, but its happened a few times in a few recent chapters, so it looks worse than it is.*/edit*
Comments from author:
Alex does get beaten up once in a while. And she does gives herself headaches once in a while from overdoing it with the tk exercises. But she's very careful. She's only taking OTC pain relievers and watching the dosage.

Hmm... a dozen times in about 15 months is pretty low for a superheroine, isn't it?
Review By [Metamorphmagus] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Rating [7 out of 10]
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from fpb
Review:
I am surprised to find two people who usually don't talk rubbish, Sir Lee and Diane, talk it so confidently.

SirLee: About "Frozen":
That guy was reaching. About half of the "evidences" he listed were stylistic choices, not plot points. It's not nearly in the league of the "Pocahontas/Avatar" similarities.
Comments from author:
I agree. After a while, I was expecting him to start saying things like:
#11: THEY'RE BOTH CARTOONS!
#12: THEY BOTH HAVE PROTAGONISTS!

All right, let's go through all twelve points and see whether this caricature fits the face.

1) Granted, the movies would not change much if the songs weren't there. This is a stylistic feature, (Enjoy this admission, it's the only one you will get.)
2) the kids are ridiculously cute. This may be a Disney commonplace (which argues against Diane's view), but it's not just style. It's a major part of the story, an immediate demand on the sympathy of the audience. It immediately blackens the villain, whereas if the kids were brats the audience would have a certain amount of sympathy for the bastard or bitch.
3) The story starts with a most royal royal family. If you think that this is just casual and that the story would be the same if the kids were the children of a poor shoemaker, as in Pinocchio... all right, I doubt anyone is quite that stupid. This is fundamental to the story; especially that the royal family is worthy of their place. In both stories we are to see that catastrophe to the royal family involves catastrophe to the whole kingdom, which would not be the case if we were talking of Pinocchio or the like.
4) By the same token, the tragic death of the King is absolutely central to the story. Even more so in Lion King, but then Lion King is the better of the two movies and the greatest thing ever to come out of the Disney studios.
5) The protagonist runs away out of fear. This is only a stylistic feature. Right.
6) Hakuna Matata = Let it Go. Apart that I really don't see all this great merit in Let it Go, whereas all the songs in LK are out of Elton John's top drawer, the emotional and plot significance of these songs is very, very close.
7) The death of the true King causes disaster at home. This is only a matter of style, of course - not a calling up of one of the most ancient and powerful mythological tropes of all time, the connection of the true king with the prosperity of the land, on which many of the greatest works of anthropology have been written. Of course not! Who would ever think of The Golden Bough in such a context? Suuurrrrrrrrre - just a stylistic feature.
8) Coinciding with this, the royal throne is usurped by a worthless and repulsive villain. Another mere stylistic trait with no influence on the plot.
9) And the usurper has convinced the true heir to the throne that the heir him/herself is guilty of manslaugther that they can never atone for. No plot or character relevance at all here. And seriously, here Lion King shows its superiority over Frozen, because the manslaughter in question is at one and the same time the tragedy that deprives the kingdom of its king and its mystical wholeness. No wonder that poor Simba cannot bear the thought. Whereas the death of a sister, though horrible, is just not as disastrous to the whole realm.
10) Once again, Lion King is much more impressive than Frozen in its climax. And yes, nearly every Disney villain since Snow-White has fallen to her/his death from a great height. As someone pointed out, gravity is not a Disney villain's friend. But how can you deny that in both movies a villainous and lying usurper is literally thrown down?
11) The return of the king (the Tolkien quote is deliberate) restores the balance of nature. Again, the idea is better done in Lion King, but it is the same.
12) The "happy ever after" is a very specific kind of "happy ever after": prince and princess are joined with the promise of future generations for the royal house, restoring the continuity whose break had meant disaster for the kingdom.

Diane and Sir Lee, all I can say is that you have a very curious idea of what is style and what is plot and content.
Comments from author:
Hey! I talk rubbish all the time!
And remember that the concept for 'Frozen' was put on the Disney table *long* before anyone imagined 'The Lion King'. Walt Disney himself pushed for a movie using the Snow Queen legend as a basis, and this has been in 'development hell' for half a century. Probably the world record for that.
[1] The opening song is a tradition going back to opera. Everyone does it. Even Joss Whedon. This is a style choice that has nothing to do with anything in the plot. Big stretch.
[2] All kids HAVE to be overly cute, unless the whole point of the story is that they are little monsters. Unless the movie is 'The Bad Seed' or something similar, the kids are cute to the point of hyperglycemia. There are no Disney movies without cute kids. Another ridiculous stretch.
[3] The concept of tragedy in the royal family causing tragedy for the land is at least as old as the Fisher King. But there are major story differences: the death of the king and queen (together) does not cause any problem in Frozen. The thing that triggers the problem for the countryside is not even a death. This is just a ridiculous stretch on the part of the video author.
[4] All Disney movies have a (real or about-to-happen) parental death that is central to the plot, either before the movie starts, at the start of the movie, or at a key point in the movie. ALL Disney movies. Walt Disney lost his mother in a really tragic way: when he made enough money he bought her a house, and she died in it due to a tragic accident. Parental death has been an underlying theme in Disney movies since then. Stretch.
[5] The 'run off in panic' motif is used really often in movies to put the character or other characters in danger. Go through the last twenty Disney movies. Find five where it is not used at least once.
[6] Big theme songs? Stock Disney repertoire. Disney has been cranking out 'I Am' songs and 'I Want' songs ever since 'The Jungle Book'. Probably earlier. Also in the repertoire: the 'Villain' song and 'The Villain Stinks' song. The 'I Am' and 'I Want' songs have been Oscar Bait ever since 'The Jungle Book'. Disney wins a large percent of these, so they put a LOT of effort into having them. This is a ridiculous stretch unless the video author has never seen any other Disney movies.
[7] You cited 'The Golden Bough'! You rock! I have a copy on my research shelves. But again, here the problem is that it is not the death of the king (and queen) that is the crisis for the kingdom, since obviously Elsa has been doing an impressive job and opening up trade communications and taking care of the area. It is that big reveal (long after that lost ship) which causes the crisis - which lasts for a couple days. In the Lion King, we're deeply in the Fisher King motif and the crisis lasts for years. They're not the same.
[8] In 'Frozen' the badguy TRIES to usurp the throne and fails. Not the same as taking over the kingdom and running it into the ground. 'The Lion King' successfully sticks to the Fisher King motif here and makes it critical to the plot. In 'Frozen' the badguy (who is handsome, brave, and determined if a complete weasel) is nothing like Scar, has no characteristics like Scar, and doesn't get the kingdom. The most he does is he gets to tell some scared people what to do for a couple hours.
[9] I think 'The Lion King' is the better movie too, but this point is silly. The video author is trying to argue that Scar does it better and differently while also trying to claim they are the same. Same? Different? He wants it both ways. It's a lot more impressive in 'The Lion King' but that's because they're plotted completely differently.
[10] Yes, 'The Lion King' has a better climax. They're nothing alike. But this is a stock trope in the Disney canon because children are watching it. It is even called 'Disney Death' over on TV Tropes. And all villains get their comeuppance in the big finale. However there is a huge difference between falling down a cliff and then being eaten by hyenas... and getting knocked over a ship's railing and falling in the water and getting hauled back out. Once again, you could make this comparison between DOZENS of Disney movies because this is how Disney handled a villain death without showing the direct violence... although 'The Lion King' went pretty far toward the maximal allowed violence. 'Frozen went pretty far toward minimal.
[11] Yes. And points for the quote. You have to save the kingdom at the end. No matter what the movie, you have to save everyone if it's a kid movie.
[12] The 'happily ever after' is *dramatically* different. In 'The Lion King' the prince becomes king, he gets the girl, they live happily ever after, they have a baby, and the baby gets a bookend moment as he is lifted into the air to recognize him as the future king. It's the circle of life. Wait, did I really say that? :D In 'Frozen' the 'happily' is a maybe. Elsa has no one except her sister. Her sister may be able to work things out with Kristof. Only Olaf gets a real 'happily ever after' and its only as long as Elsa's magic holds up. The badguy is still alive. It is not at all like The Fisher King or like 'The Lion King'.

Gee, I wanted to avoid a forty paragraph essay on this, and I manage to have failed. Oops.
Review By [fpb] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from TiaC
Review:
Alex needing to catch a plane to Roswell got me thinking.

A bit of math shows that Alex can be anywhere on the planet in ~an hour. The key to this is getting out of the atmosphere.

The tk strength she shows in this chapter should be enough to apply around 2.5 gs of acceleration to herself. I will assume her silver form is at least as aerodynamic as a skydiver who knows what they are doing.

Terminal velocity for a skydiver is at least 260km/hr. However, she has 1.5 gs of upward acceleration, so she'll achieve 320km/hr. This will easily get her to space in less than 10 minutes (Edit: It looks like it's less than 5 minutes actually). If she spends 20 minutes accelerating and 20 minutes decelerating with 1.5 gs of acceleration, she travels 21,600km, leaving her more than 10 minutes to fall back through the atmosphere (Which will only take 2/3rds as long as going up at most) after traveling anywhere on the planet.

Sustained acceleration is rather insane in space.
Comments from author:
Yes. Alex has not worked this out yet. Right now, she's flying at about 150 mph (240 kph) and is limited by wind resistance while in the bottom few miles of the atmosphere. So she won't get much acceleration until she's above, say, five miles. Then the acceleration won't be 1.5g until she's even higher. But she can get well up into the atmosphere to the point that wind resistance becomes much much lower, and then she can start moving toward 2.5g acceleration. Once she's high enough, she can accelerate to ridiculous speeds fairly rapidly.

In fact, if you go back and look, you'll see that I did this with her when she went up to the ISS. She kept getting ahead of what she was aiming at, and she didn't realize that the problem was her acceleration when she was used to hitting a maximum speed and having no further acceleration.
Review By [TiaC] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Rating [10 out of 10]
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from asqwerth
Review:
Another enjoyable chapter.

But I really, really, do not like the song, 'Let It Go'. The melody and most of the chord structure for the chorus are pretty meh and generic to me, except for that one bit towards the end. I enjoyed the other songs more.

So the fact that the Alexverse is also inundated with the same hit tune, and worse, as a Terawatt tribute, is a horrible thought!

:-P
Comments from author:
:D It's a Disney song. That automatically puts the songwriter under constraints on complexity and chord structure. I still thought it was better than the other choices for Best Song. But then they don't usually do that great a job of picking the best five songs from all Hollywood movies in the given year.
Review By [asqwerth] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from fpb
Review:
Magi, it depends on the amount of control on telekinesis they have. One thing that everyone knows about sex is that if you do it wrong it's painful. Well, unless you are a member of the BDSM community, of course.
Comments from author:
:D :D Control of tk will have to be automatic and instinctive too, because we tend to lose control in the moment. And the bigger your tk hammer, the more it matters. And what about psychics who maintain that wall blocking off outside thoughts? Most of the superpowers have some potential downside in this area.
Review By [fpb] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from Magi
Review:
Doc Fraiser should interview Azure Crush and Sergi and write a paper on safe sex for superpowered people. It's going to be needed eventually, there's going to be a lot more superpowered people pretty soon. You could call it...the Kama Supera. Either that or a VERY X-rated conference call between Azure, Terrawatt, Action Girl, and Doc Fraiser.

Has Doc Fraiser given Azure Crush a checkup yet like she did for Alex?

And then in a few more years the Macks can help her with a paper of superpowered pregnancies.

Telekinetics are going to be able to have really weird-kinky sex, aren't they?
Comments from author:
:D :D I think it's time to get a copy of Sara's 'The Little Purple Book' from some other dimension. There are tons of key issues that no one deals with in PG-rated comics.

And how does Az manage not to crush Sergei into paste?
Review By [Magi] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Summer Vacations" from SirLee
Review:
About "Frozen":
That guy was reaching. About half of the "evidences" he listed were stylistic choices, not plot points. It's not nearly in the league of the "Pocahontas/Avatar" similarities.
Comments from author:
I agree. After a while, I was expecting him to start saying things like:
#11: THEY'RE BOTH CARTOONS!
#12: THEY BOTH HAVE PROTAGONISTS!
:D
Review By [SirLee] • Date [19 Sep 14] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "An American in Paris" from Ephemeral
Review:
Well, no costume, but she can just stay silvery so its not THAT big a deal.

Speaking of her silvery morph: "Her silvery morph is telekinesis on a sub-atomic scale, as Sam Carter has theorized."

I have been breaking my brain trying to figure out how this can possibly be true, and there's just no way there isn't SOMETHING else going on, up to and including it being entirely a separate warper power.

Two critical issues:

Her brain. If the silvery morph ISN'T the event horizon of a stable extradimensional distortion, and her body is actually being transmuted into a homogenous mass, WHAT IS SHE USING TO THINK while her brain isn't around?

Persistence. Both herself, her equipment, and other people come OUT of the morph completely unaltered, so if they are also actually being transmuted, WHERE IS THE INFORMATION BEING STORED for them to be reconstituted? Because Alex certainly isn't memorizing exabytes worth of matter-pattern data.

Edit:
Okay. If that's how it works, why can't Alex, say, take an apple and a pile of gravel into her morph, and then use the mass of the gravel to pull a pile of apple copies out of her morph? Or heck, pull Jack O'Neill into her morph along with a couple of cows and use the mass of the cows to drop a half-dozen Jack O'Neills out of her morph?
Comments from author:
I'm stealing the basic Whateley Universe idea of 'pattern theory' and explaining the stored information as being preserved extra-dimensionally, along with the necessary energy: there is no way Alex can eat enough to fuel this kind of energy drain.
Review By [Ephemeral] • Date [18 Sep 14] • Not Rated
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