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Someone Else's Mess

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Review of chapter "Back to the Beginning" from Alkeni
Review:
Out of curiosity, why is it you chose to do this with Wesley - having him rejoin the council and be appointed envoy - rather than have him join up with Angel mid-season 1? In fact...well, Angel season 1 is over...was Wesley with them at any point?

I don't mind what you did here (well, I find it a little annoying because I'm a huge Wesley fan - he's my Favorite Buffyverse character, but then I don't expect to like everything done in a given fic), I'm just curious as to your thought process.
Comments from author:
There was no automatic reason why he should join Angel's group. They were somewhat different for one thing - Doyle still alive and Kate Lockley, with no Cordy (who'd at least had some liking for him). Angel had no reason to trust him. In any case, I need him for my sequel Fate's Little Plaything, where he'll eventually gravitate back to the Sunnydale team. Personally, I never really liked him, but I'll be using his character later. At the end of season 3, though, he was still a snivelling little weasel - the sort who was more likely to ingratiate himself back into the Council's good graces, than set off alone as a rogue demon hunter.
Review By [Alkeni] • Date [4 Dec 11] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "The Assignment" from Alkeni
Review:
In the Initiative's defense, I don't think they knew what the Mayor was up to until he actually went all snake-y, and by the time that happened, there was no way for them to get people into position.
Comments from author:
That's perhaps the case, but in my story they had all of Sunnydale under close and constant surveillance for a long time before the season 4 period. They definitely should have noticed that something was wrong with the Mayor - his contacts for example, like Trick, a dark Faith, etc. They also knew more about the Slayer and so forth than in canon, but were too busy collecting information for their own purposes to make contact with the people who were actually protecting the town. Their inaction is, therefore, indefensible.

Thanks for the review.
Review By [Alkeni] • Date [4 Dec 11] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Future Propositions" from fandomoverload
Review:
This was fantastic. took me a little longer on this one them prior nut i loved it. on to the next
Comments from author:
Glad you enjoyed it - thanks for the review. I'm afraid "Fate's Little Plaything" will take you even longer than this one - it's about seven times the length, so I hope you don't get bored!
Review By [fandomoverload] • Date [2 Dec 11] • Rating [10 out of 10]
Review of chapter "Future Propositions" from maxthehobbit
Review:
This is only the fourth story I have ever recommended. I've read nearly every Buffy story on the net. I passed up this one because it was about Cordelia, my mistake. This is so well written and gives Cordy a much better image than on BtVS. Hard to believe you're not in or retired from the US military, your accuracy is damn near perfect, no flaws I could find. The action in this story is very believable and entertaining, even the lead up to the attack on the Initiative caves is good reading. And it wasn't all stiff and fact based reading ... a lot of humor laced in the story as well. All in all one of the best reads I've found in the last two years and I know I'll read it again in a couple of years. Good literature is even better when read a second time. I'm looking forward to the next installment of this series which is much longer than this story and I know it's going to be a great read.
Thanks for writing and posting this to share your exceptional writing ability.
Comments from author:
Thanks for the review - glad you enjoyed it. I tried to make my Cordelia closer to the mid-season 3 Angel version (before the writers did horrible things with her character). In Angel she was beginning to evolve into a much better human being, albiet still with her snarky. I decided that real adversity and new challenges - unemployed and on the brink of homelessness and going hungry, followed by being forced into the Army by a vengeance demon - might have some major changes on her character, especially if her home environment was less than kind to her previously. I'm not ex-military (not even from the US) but I teach military science and military history and I've worked closely with the Royal Navy in the past.

Hope you enjoy the next part.
Review By [maxthehobbit] • Date [6 Oct 11] • Rating [10 out of 10]
Review of chapter "Future Propositions" from mariposa
Review:
I was led to your work by a ficlet from Marcel - boy am I ever grateful. This is an amazing series. I have to admit I burst out laughing at the end when reading your author's note asking for info on medals and service awards. From the level of detail in your stories, I had imagined you to be some sort of super-informed career armed forces person.
Great job!Now I'll forgo sleep and read more of your wonderful fanfic.
Comments from author:
Thanks for the review - glad you enjoyed it. I'm not actually in the armed forces, though I teach military history and military science, but more from a British perspective - hence I wasn't so sure about the nuances of US medals.
Review By [mariposa] • Date [24 Jun 11] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Future Propositions" from (Current Donor)vidicon
Review:
A magnificent continuation and well worth a read. Highly recommended and the author to be commended.
Comments from author:
Thanks for the review - glad you enjoyed it.
Review By [(Current Donor)vidicon] • Date [4 Jun 11] • Rating [9 out of 10]
Review of chapter "Future Propositions" from WereGargoyle
Review:
No Problem I enjoy looking up information in order to help others - which is why I'm majoring in Library Sciences.

Still, having the PotUS, JCS, SecDef, SecArm, or SecAF give the Scoobies some "civilian"-level awards- including Giles as some are able to be awarded to foreign nationals - would probably blow their minds.
Comments from author:
Thanks for this. In the sequel (of which you already seem to have read a major chunk), Cordelia recieved a Silver Star, while the others all received the Air Force Civilian Award for Valor, plus a monetary reward as "civilian consultants".
Review By [WereGargoyle] • Date [13 Apr 11] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Future Propositions" from WereGargoyle
Review:
In order of Rank

The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Army, for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree to be above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but not meeting the criteria for the Medal of Honor. The Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Navy Cross (Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) and the Air Force Cross (Air Force). This decoration is distinct from the Distinguished Service Medal, which is awarded to persons in recognition of exceptionally meritorious service to the government of the United States in a duty of great responsibility.

The Air Force Cross is the second highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Air Force. The Air Force Cross is the Air Force decoration equivalent to the Distinguished Service Cross(Army) and the Navy Cross (Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard). The Air Force Cross is awarded for extraordinary heroism not justifying the award of the Medal of Honor. It may be awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the U.S Air Force, distinguishes him or herself by extraordinary heroism in combat.
Title 10, Section 8742. Air Force Cross: Award
"The President may award an Air Force Cross of appropriate design, with ribbons and appurtenances, to a person who, while serving in any capacity with the Air Force, distinguishes himself by extraordinary heroism not justifying the award of a Medal of Honor: 1) while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States; 2) while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or 3) while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

The Distinguished Service Medal (DSM) is a military award of the United States Army that is presented to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the United States military, has distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious service to the Government in a duty of great responsibility. The performance must be such as to merit recognition for service that is clearly exceptional. Exceptional performance of normal duty will not alone justify an award of this decoration.
Separate Distinguished Service Medals exist for the different branches of the military as well as a fifth version of the medal which is a senior award of the United States Department of Defense. The Army version of the Distinguished Service Medal is typically referred to simply as the "Distinguished Service Medal" while the other branches of service use the service name as a prefix.
For service not related to actual war, the term "duty of a great responsibility" applies to a narrower range of positions than in time of war, and requires evidence of conspicuously significant achievement. However, justification of the award may accrue by virtue of exceptionally meritorious service in a succession of high positions of great importance.
Awards may be made to persons other than members of the Armed Forces of the United States for wartime services only, and then only under exceptional circumstances, with the express approval of the President in each case.
The Distinguished Service Medal is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the United States Army, has distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious service to the Government in a duty of great responsibility.
The performance must be such as to merit recognition for service which is clearly exceptional.
Exceptional performance of normal duty will not alone justify an award of this decoration.
For service not related to actual war, the term "duty of a great responsibility" applies to a narrower range of positions, than in time of war, and requires evidence of conspicuously significant achievement.
However, justification of the award may accrue by virtue of exceptionally meritorious service in a succession of high positions of great importance.
Awards may be made to persons other than members of the Armed Forces of the United States for wartime services only, and then only under exceptional circumstances, with the express approval of the President in each case.

The Air Force Distinguished Service Medal was created by an act of the United States Congress on July 6, 1960. The medal was intended as a new decoration of the United States Air Force to replace the policy of awarding the Army Distinguished Service Medal to Air Force personnel.
The Air Force Distinguished Service Medal is awarded to any member of the United States Air Force who has distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious service to the United States Government in a duty of great responsibility. The interpretation of the phrase "great responsibility" means that this medal is generally awarded only to officers who hold at least the rank of Major General. However, as is customary for most military decorations, the requirements for the Distinguished Service Medal are interpreted more liberally when awarded upon retirement. As a result, it is the typical decoration for a retiring Brigadier General, and in recent years it has also been awarded to the Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force upon retirement.
Cases of the award of this decoration to an individual who was not a general officer, or the Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force, are unusual. The medal is typically awarded to senior Air Force generals. One notable exception is the astronaut Buzz Aldrin who was awarded this decoration even though he retired as a colonel.
The first recipient of the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal was Major General Osmond J. Ritland, USAF, who received his medal on November 30, 1965 upon his retirement

The Silver Star is the third-highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States armed forces for valor in the face of the enemy. The Silver Star is awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States not justifying one of the two higher awards - the service crosses (Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross, or the Air Force Cross), the second-highest military decoration, or the Medal of Honor, the highest decoration. The Silver Star may be awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the armed forces, distinguishes himself or herself by extraordinary heroism involving one of the following actions: 1) In action against an enemy of the United States, 2) While engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force, 3) While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party

The Bronze Star Medal (or BSM) is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration that may be awarded for bravery, acts of merit, or meritorious service. When awarded for bravery, it is the fourth-highest combat award of the U.S. Armed Forces and the ninth highest military award (including both combat and non-combat awards) in the order of precedence of U.S. military decorations. Officers from the other federal uniformed services are also eligible to receive the award if they are militarized or detailed to serve with a service branch of the armed forces.

The Purple Heart is a United States military decoration awarded in the name of the President to those who have been wounded or killed while serving on or after April 5, 1917 with the U.S. military. With its forerunner, the Badge of Military Merit, which took the form of a heart made of purple cloth, the Purple Heart is the oldest award that is still given to members of the U.S. military, the only earlier award being the obsolete Fidelity Medallion.
Per United States Army regulations, the Purple Heart is awarded in the name of the President of the United States to any member of the Armed Forces of the United States who, while serving under competent authority in any capacity with one of the U.S. Armed Services after April 5, 1917, has been wounded or killed, or who has died after being wounded. Specific examples of services which warrant the Purple Heart include any action against an enemy of the United States; any action with an opposing armed force of a foreign country in which the Armed Forces of the United States are or have been engaged; while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party; as a result of an act of any such enemy of opposing armed forces; or as the result of an act of any hostile foreign force. After 28 March 1973, as a result of an international terrorist attack against the United States or a foreign nation friendly to the United States, recognized as such an attack by the Secretary of the Army, or jointly by the Secretaries of the separate armed services concerned if persons from more than one service are wounded in the attack. After 28 March 1973, as a result of military operations while serving outside the territory of the United States as part of a peacekeeping force.
The Purple Heart differs from all other decorations in that an individual is not "recommended" for the decoration; rather he or she is entitled to it upon meeting specific criteria. A Purple Heart is authorized for the first wound suffered under conditions indicated above, but for each subsequent award an oak leaf cluster is awarded. Not more than one award will be made for more than one wound or injury received at the same instant. A "wound" is defined as an injury to any part of the body from an outside force or agent sustained under one or more of the conditions listed above. A physical lesion is not required; however, the wound for which the award is made must have required treatment by a medical officer and records of medical treatment for wounds or injuries received in action must have been made a matter of official record. When contemplating an award of this decoration, the key issue that commanders must take into consideration is the degree to which the enemy caused the injury. The fact that the proposed recipient was participating in direct or indirect combat operations is a necessary prerequisite, but is not sole justification for award. The Purple Heart is not awarded for non-combative injuries.
Enemy-related injuries which justify the award of the Purple Heart include injury caused by enemy bullet,shrapnel, or other projectile created by enemy action; injury caused by enemy placed land mine, naval mine, or trap; injury caused by enemy released chemical, biological, or nuclear agent; injury caused by vehicle or aircraft accident resulting from enemy fire; concussion injuries caused as a result of enemy generated explosions.
Injuries or wounds which do not qualify for award of the Purple Heart include frostbite or trench foot injuries; heat stroke; food poisoning not caused by enemy agents; chemical, biological, or nuclear agents not released by the enemy; battle fatigue; disease not directly caused by enemy agents; accidents, to include explosive, aircraft, vehicular, and other accidental wounding not related to or caused by enemy action; self-inflicted wounds (e.g., a soldier accidentally fires their own gun and the bullet strikes their leg), except when in the heat of battle, and not involving gross negligence; post-traumatic stress disorders, and jump injuries not caused by enemy action.
It is not intended that such a strict interpretation of the requirement for the wound or injury to be caused by direct result of hostile action be taken that it would preclude the award being made to deserving personnel. Commanders must also take into consideration the circumstances surrounding an injury, even if it appears to meet the criteria. In the case of an individual injured while making a parachute landing from an aircraft that had been brought down by enemy fire; or, an individual injured as a result of a vehicle accident caused by enemy fire, the decision will be made in favor of the individual and the award will be made. As well, individuals wounded or killed as a result of "friendly fire" in the "heat of battle" will be awarded the Purple Heart as long as the "friendly" projectile or agent was released with the full intent of inflicting damage or destroying enemy troops or equipment. Individuals injured as a result of their own negligence, such as by driving or walking through an unauthorized area known to have been mined or placed off limits or searching for or picking up unexploded munitions as war souvenirs, will not be awarded the Purple Heart as they clearly were not injured as a result of enemy action, but rather by their own negligence.
From 1942 to 1997, civilians serving or closely affiliated with the armed forces—as government employees,Red Cross workers, war correspondents and the like—were eligible to receive the Purple Heart. About 100 men and women received the award, the most famous being newspaperman Ernie Pyle, who was awarded a posthumous Army Purple Heart after being killed by Japanese machine gun fire in 1945.
In 1997, however, at the urging of the Military Order of the Purple Heart, Congress passed legislation prohibiting future awards of the Purple Heart to civilians. Today, the Purple Heart is only for those men and women in uniform. Civilians who are killed or wounded as a result of hostile action now receive the new Defense of Freedom Medal, created shortly after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

The Defense Meritorious Service Medal (DMSM) is the third-highest award bestowed upon members of the United States military by the United States Department of Defense. The medal is awarded in the name of the Secretary of Defense to members of the Armed Forces who, while serving in a joint activity, distinguish themselves by non-combat outstanding achievement or meritorious service, but not of a degree to warrant award of the Defense Superior Service Medal.
Additional awards of the Defense Meritorious Service Medal are denoted by oak leaf clusters. The medal is not the same as the Meritorious Service Medal, which is a separate federal military decoration. Both have virtually identical award criteria, but the DMSM is awarded to service members assigned to joint, multi-service organizations, while the MSM is awarded to service members in traditional military units within their respective individual services.

The Meritorious Service Medal is a military decoration presented to members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguished themselves by outstanding meritorious achievement or service to the United States subsequent to January 16, 1969. Effective 11 September 2001, this award also may be bestowed for meritorious achievement in a designated combat theatre. Normally, the acts or services rendered must be comparable to that required for the Legion of Merit but in a duty of lesser, though considerable, responsibility. A higher decoration, known as the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, is intended for similar services performed under joint service with the United States Department of Defense. Today, most MSM recipients are field grade officers (pay grades O-4 to O-6), senior warrant officers (W-3 to W-5), senior noncommissioned officers (E-7 to E-9), foreign military personnel in the ranks of O-6 and below, and individuals who have displayed a level of service that warrants an award of such magnitude. To receive this award the individual must exhibit exceptionally meritorious service at that level of responsibility.

The Commendation Medal is a mid-level United States military decorationwhich is presented for sustained acts of heroism or meritorious service. For valorous actions in direct contact with an enemy force, but of a lesser degree than required for the award of the Bronze Star, the Valor device ("V" device) may be authorized as an attachment to the decoration. Each branch of the United States Armed Forces issues its own version of the Commendation Medal, with a fifth version existing for acts of joint military service performed under theDepartment of Defense.
The Commendation Medal was originally a ribbon, and was first issued by the Navy and U.S. Coast Guard in 1943. An Army Commendation Ribbon followed in 1945, and in 1949, the Navy, Coast Guard, and Army Commendation ribbons were renamed the "Commendation Ribbon with Medal Pendant." By 1960, the Commendation Ribbons had been authorized as full medals and were subsequently referred to as Commendation Medals.
The Army Commendation Medal is awarded to any member of the Armed Forces of the United States other than General Officers who, while serving in any capacity with the Army after 6 December 1941, distinguished themself by heroism, meritorious achievement or meritorious service. Award may be made to a member of the Armed Forces of a friendly foreign nation who, after 1 June 1962, distinguishes themself by an act of heroism, extraordinary achievement, or significant meritorious service which has been of mutual benefit to the friendly nation and the United States.
For additional awards of the Commendation Medal, the Army issues bronze and silver oak leaf clusters while the Navy and Coast Guard furnish gold and silver award stars. The Operational Distinguishing Device is authorized for the Coast Guard Commendation Medal upon approval of the awarding authority.
The Commendation Medal is awarded by operational commanders, requiring the signature of an Officer in the grade of O-6, allowing for interpretation of the criteria for which the medal may be awarded. For instance, in the U.S. Navy and United States Marine Corps, the Commendation Medal is considered a somewhat high decoration reserved for Department level officers, senior CPOs and, following a full career, as a retirement award. The awarding of the Commendation Medal in the U.S. Army is not limited to senior service members, and can be awarded to NCOs and junior officers Captains O-3 and below.
The U.S. Air Force began issuing its own Commendation Medal in 1958 with additional awards denoted by oak leaf clusters. It was not until 1996 that the "V" device was authorized on the Air Force Commendation Medal. Prior to that time, there was not a Valor distinction in effect for the Air Force Commendation Medal.
U.S. Marines have always been issued the Navy Commendation Medal and there is not a separate Commendation Medal intended only for Marines. This lack of difference was recognized in 1994 whenSecretary of the Navy John Howard Dalton changed the name of the Navy Commendation Medal to theNavy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal.
The last of the Commendation Medals is the Joint Service Commendation Medal which was created in 1963. This award is intended for senior service on a joint military staff and is senior in precedence to service-specific Commendation Medals. As such, it is worn above the service Commendation Medals on a military uniform. As a joint award, multiple awards are denoted with an oak leaf cluster regardless of service.
Order of Precedence is following Bronze Star but before POW and Campaign Medals.
Each of the military services also issue an Achievement Medal, which is a lesser decoration.


The Presidential Citizens Medal is the second highest civilian award in the United States, second only to the Presidential Medal of Freedom. It is awarded by the President of the United States. Established on November 13, 1969, the Presidential Citizens Medal may be granted to any United States citizen "who [has] performed exemplary deeds or services for his or her country or fellow citizens". The medal may be awarded posthumously.

The Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service is the second highest award presented by the Secretary of Defense to non-career Federal employees, private citizens, and foreign nationals for contributions, assistance, or support to Department of Defense functions extensive enough to warrant recognition, but are lesser in scope and impact than is required for the DoD Medal for Distinguished Public Service. The Secretary of Defense is the approval authority. An individual may receive this award more than once. Subsequent awards consist of the foregoing recognition devices and a bronze, silver, or gold palm, as appropriate

The Secretary of the Army Public Service Award consists of a silver medal, lapel button, and citation certificate. The United States Secretary of the Army awards this decoration to those who provide exceptional service that makes a substantial contribution to the accomplishment of the Army's missions. These include any individual (except Army civilian employees who are eligible for Army honorary awards, military personnel, or Army contractors).

The Outstanding Civilian Service Award is the third highest honor the United States Department of the Army can bestow upon a civilian. Eligible recipients include any individual (except Army civilian employees who are eligible for Army honorary awards, military personnel, or Army contractors), Federal Government officials at the policy development level, and technical personnel who serve the Army in an advisory capacity or as consultants

The Commander's Award for Public Service is the fourth highest honor the United States Department of the Army can bestow upon a civilian, ranking directly below the Outstanding Civilian Service Award. Army civilian employees who are eligible for Army honorary awards or military personnel are not eligible. Civilians not employed by the Army, Army contractors, Federal Government officials at the policy development level, and technical personnel who serve the Army in an advisory capacity or as consultants are eligible. AR672-20 regulates the award.
Comments from author:
Thanks for this. I hope you were able to use cut and paste, rather than typing this all in on my account!
Review By [WereGargoyle] • Date [12 Apr 11] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "The Assignment" from WereGargoyle
Review:
Giving Giles the SecDef Medal for Outstanding Public Service would probably blow his Tweed-wearing mind!
Review By [WereGargoyle] • Date [12 Apr 11] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Future Propositions" from Elgin
Review:
I recently had the amazing and delightful privilege of discovering your magnificent 'A Different Future' series. After spending a very enjoyable three days mostly sitting at my PC and reading through your work, I became hooked, spent close on seven weeks on-and-off trying to compile a review that I felt had a chance of doing this fanfic some sort of justice, and I am greatly looking forward to your future instalments for this series.

Why did I take nearly seven weeks to finish compiling this review?

Because this fanfic - and, indeed, the rest of the ADF series - is quite simply a masterpiece.

"Someone Else's Mess" is an excellent example of what I like to call 'redirected avalanche fanfics' - where just one tiny pebble bouncing in a different direction causes a chain reaction that results in a markedly different outcome to canon. Not a lot of fanfic writers can pull that off anywhere near this effectively; a great many simply regurgitate BtVS canon (or the canon of their crossover fandoms) with a minor twist worked in here and there. If such a 'fic is well-written then it can sometimes be reasonably entertaining, but on the whole it's not especially impressive.

Your writing is by far a different story altogether. SEM includes original villains (the Jaylokh Demon was by far the best fan-created Buffy-verse 'mastermind-pattern' villain I've discovered to date, and its presentation in SEM is a textbook example of a successful application of the 'less-is-more' approach), original demons, and from the first scene alone it's blatantly obvious that the events of BtVS and AtS canon can be waved 'bye-bye' and 'good riddance'.

You handle your chosen crossover fandoms with an outstanding deftness that I've rarely found anywhere else, and your characterisation generally falls into one of two categories: 'Dead on' or 'Improvement over canon'. I acknowledge that some characters, particularly Riley Finn, are a bit OOC from canon; however, I contend that in every case your alterations are a marked improvement.

Quite simply, it seems that you've cherry-picked the best points of BtVS/AtS and your crossover fandoms, thrown out as much of the dross as you can get away with, and then replaced said dross with superior material and ideas either borrowed from other fandoms or of your own devising. (Although in fairness to Whedon and Co., they couldn't have implemented a crossover with SG-1, NCIS or JAG for legal reasons, whereas fanfic writers are allowed to get away with that sort of thing.) Some might criticise you for not adhering to canon on these points; I, on the other hand, wish to commend you for doing so.

Another of this fanfic's strengths is its length: it's not too long and unwieldy, and it's certainly not too short. It covers a well-proportioned segment of the events of the ADF series, and ends at an excellent juncture. Again, that's a problem for a lot of fanfic writers - a great many of them have severe difficulties in letting go of a fanfic and ending it before continuing the series in another. All too often this leads to 'fics that are a ridiculous length and are extremely cumbersome and awkward for the purposes of the reader.

As for Cordelia... she's all too often underused as a character in fanfics. She has a lot of potential for growth, some of which was capitalised on in AtS canon. Too, she got the short end of the stick in AtS canon, which (to my relief) looks certain never to happen in your ADF series. Watching her bloom into a strong and confident young woman who is very ready, willing and capable of kicking arse, taking names, going toe-to-toe with Gibbs in a verbal sparring match and walking away the victor, and at the end of the day is still able to kick back and relax among her friends and surrogate family... well, seeing all of that has been a truly enjoyable experience for me.

I offer you a great many thanks for sharing this fantastic fanfic with the world, and the very best of wishes with your future literary endeavours.

Ride free!

El :)
Comments from author:
I really don't know what to say here... With this amount of praise, I'm afraid my head might explode! Bearing in mind your comment about length, I'm just hoping you don't find the sequel too long (it's much longer, but effectively covers my version of season 5, while still concentrating on Cordelia's development).

Thanks for the complements and hope you enjoy the rest of the series. :-)
Review By [Elgin] • Date [22 Jan 11] • Rating [10 out of 10]
Review of chapter "Future Propositions" from RafMereC
Review:
Great story.

Raf
Comments from author:
Thanks - glad you enjoyed it.
Review By [RafMereC] • Date [7 Dec 10] • Rating [10 out of 10]
Review of chapter "Future Propositions" from (Recent Donor)Hawklan
Review:
9. Aftermath and Training

ahh good they talked with Buffy and Cordy about that stuff and now boot-camp ala Slayer?
Poor Scobbies *g*
rofl about the turning into a bunny part *g*
Cordy a Potential...oh man she will be pissed of about that...


10. Taking the Initiative

ahh good how Tara saved the day for Team C and tsts team A takes time for a BBQ *g*
uhh nice how C dealt with the croc now let see how she fares.

11. Future Propositions

HEHE nice mourning for Kinsey and nice conclusion to this story. Many thanks for sharing this fine story.
Comments from author:
Thanks for this - glad you enjoyed it. Hope you also enjoy the sequels.
Review By [(Recent Donor)Hawklan] • Date [14 Sep 10] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Future Propositions" from MemoryKing
Review:
This fic is extremely well written. Characterisation is top notch for everyone except possibly Riley, who needed to change for the story to work. The fight in the cave was cool, I liked the fact that not everyone got away unhurt. The senator being drained dry was a fully deserved fate.

Will be looking forward to finding out if you decided to use this as a realistic divergence point for season five.

Thanks for writing!
Comments from author:
Thanks for the review. You're right that Riley had to change somewhat for my story to work, though his ultra-patriotism might only have needed a little tweaking to send him in this direction. I tried not to make any other character OOC. My next story, "Fate's Little Plaything" diverges in part for season 5, though not entirely.
Review By [MemoryKing] • Date [5 Sep 10] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Putting the Smack Down Hard (Part Two)" from (Recent Donor)Hawklan
Review:
7. Putting the Smack Down Hard (Part One)

Ahhh Riley is in deep shit now...annoying Jack? Never a good idea....
Kinsey coming to Sunnydale...ahh I hope a stake finds him *g*
Buffy in BDU's??? rofl........

8. Putting the Smack Down Hard (Part Two)

ouch Buffy must really have kicked hard and Kinsey killed by a vamp Harmony? If
that isn't some kind of justice.
Comments from author:
Thanks for the review. Thanks to Buffy's "surgery", Riley is now permanently neutered.
Review By [(Recent Donor)Hawklan] • Date [2 Sep 10] • Not Rated
Review of chapter "Encounters" from (Recent Donor)Hawklan
Review:
ahh SG1 encounters their 1st vamps and the gang throws a party on the a graveyard *g*
Review By [(Recent Donor)Hawklan] • Date [1 Sep 10] • Rating [10 out of 10]
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